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20121222
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
. it was days before the 1960 election and she thought i should see it. so she put me on top of a mailbox on this huge boulevard and i watched as this canyon filled in with people. and this very charismatic young man -- i was hooked. i did not know what he was saying. i did not understand what he was saying. how was not that precocious. and i knew it was very important. it was very exciting. now i know from google what he said and part of what he said was i am not running on a platform that says if you elect me things will be easy. being an american 6 in 1960 is very hazardous but with hope we will decide which path we take. i thought back at those words over the last four years because it was parallel to another young candidate. jesse barry had a very difficult life as she had hoped for the future. and i think about what she would have thought, knowing that that little boy shook on the mailbox would be working for the president and that president would be named barack obama. it is incredible. >> politics was a part of the conversation on a regular basis with your parents? >> yes. that wa
for us. but it all started about two days before election day. i had this realization that this was a possibility. this could actually happen. i went to the door of rabin's office and said, what if all of these major offices were held by women? this would be historic. we should do any event if it happens. so, as my friends now, my family, i am a self-proclaimed news and political junkie. on election night and had the tv, my laptop, and my i found, i was watching as the results came in. and it was happening. it happened. so yes, there were phone calls, there were e-mails, logistics', food selection, printing, tables, chairs, all the logistics. how this event king together is a question -- what if? what if we could get them. and i am so happy that we have. i am sure all of them will agree that type of vision is what put all of these five women where they are today. that question -- what if? today's event is bigger. it is bigger than political parties, bigger than politics. bigger than the chamber of commerce. today it is history in the making. it is not just a raised gla
telling than just what one election result might suggest. >> well, i think it certainly does and it gives him a certain platform and credibility that perhaps he didn't have before. but watching as these fiscal cliff negotiations have gone through the holidays, it certainly is perhaps a little bit more of a bully pulpit for the president and for his position on taxes. but i think the biggest story of the year came at the end of the year in the past week or so which is the massacre at sandy hook elementary school in newtown and i think the presidency now might be shaped by those events and those are the stories that both barnicle and andrea have chose n as the top story. would you agree this could be a signature for the second term? >> i to do. i do agree with that. i think the events of a few days ago in newtown, connecticut, will help shape a good portion of the president's second and final term in office. i think it gives us a huge impe it tus to changes in this country that had had taken too long to take hold. i think the presidency itself, i think the man himself was shaped and altered
shortly after the november presidential election. this is an hour and half. >> one of the best things about sitting across from you is that, for all of us who have been part of the institute's staff, we are wondering what you been thinking, with this experience has been like for you over the last year-and-a-half, two years. so tonight, we get to hear for the first time your reaction to the campaign. >> thank you very much. i want to thank the in boyer for the support the university has given the institute politics, including making it possible for us to hire such extraordinary people like steve edwards and been restored and all of the other people -- and ben reeseberg and all the other people. [applause] you have been wondering what i have been doing and i have been wondering what you have been doing. [laughter] >> those who were disappointed by this outcome, the democrats elated by this outcome -- given the conventional wisdom around this campaign, the president's approval ratings that were barely above 50%, often dipping below it, the unemployment around 8%, gdp growth stock of arou
the queen, i believe as prime minister t morning after you won the election i believe that you're meeting was slight ackquard that a few things happened that weren't protocol. do you remember what happened. he says well what do they do in the film? so blair used the film that we had made up as a way to answer that question. so it's an extraordinary reversal of things. >> howard and david, so with both shows, with "homeland" now and with "24" in the past, were there actions with various government agencies particularly with terism with yourself and those agencies and did they respond at all to what was going on on in the show? >> no. they really were -- the show is so fundamentally propost rouse, the ood that so much could happen and have a middle and end in 24 shours fundamentally crazy and "homeland" deposit that is the cia is operating on our soil which as far as i know isn't happening. but there is emotional truth to the characters and our relationship with the military and count terism agencies. they were fans. they became fans of the show and they just kind of, we got calls from peop
career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was st
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)